ROBOCOP (2014)

Directed By: Jose Padilha
Written By: Joshua Zetumer
Based On The Original 1987 Screenplay By: Edward Neumeier & Michael Miner Cinematography By: Lula Carvalho
Editor: Peter McNulty & Daniel Rezende

Cast: Joel Kinnaman, Gary Oldman, Michael Keaton, Michael K. Williams, Jay Baruchel, Jackie Earle Haley, Samuel L. Jackson, Jennifer Ehle, Marianne Jean-Baptiste, Aimee Garcia

In RoboCop, the year is 2028 and multinational conglomerate OmniCorp is at the center of robot technology. Overseas, their drones have been used by the military for years – and it’s meant billions for OmniCorp’s bottom line. Now OmniCorp wants to bring their controversial technology to the home front, and they see a golden opportunity to do it. When Alex Murphy – a loving husband, father and good cop doing his best to stem the tide of crime and corruption in Detroit – is critically injured in the line of duty, OmniCorp sees their chance for a part-man, part-robot police officer. OmniCorp envisions a RoboCop in every city and even more billions for their shareholders, but they never counted on one thing: there is still a man inside the machine pursuing justice.


Though a sanitized version of the original. This film retains some of the original aspects of the film. While managing to care about its own identity that is somewhat noteworthy and is better at being a reboot than something like TOTAL RECALL which tried too hard to be a virtual remake with all the greatest hits they try to change it around.

The film tries to be somewhat satirical with a lot less bite. It is strangely more on point and cynical though takes the time to explain as feels more Of the time whereas the original always felt futuristic.

The film allows the director Jose Padilha (ELITE SQUAD) to keep his hand-held style of filming and guerrilla, you are their filmmaking skills.

The original ROBOCOP was more memorable as it looked accomplished for a film with such a low budget. In this film, you see the big-budget onscreen. No one essentially embarrasses themselves. The film just feels basic by the end. Nothing really to give it an identity or make it memorable. Especially when it already has so many naysayers against It just for being made as the film is still relevant and remembered. At least this film tries to be an honest reboot.

The changes really hammer home some points. The revealing scene of what is left of him is really a gripping scene aided by impressive special effects.

The film is more excessive in price and scope than the original which was more excessive In Behavior, violence, and action. Now of course the studio wants the film to appeal to broader demographics. So it is softened torn a hard R to a pg-13 rating aim end more at a younger audience.
Director Jose Padilha and actor Joel Kinnaman fought hard for an R rating, but due to the ever-expanding budget, which went from a modest $60 million budget and ballooned to a $120 million budget, studio executives were forced to deliver a PG-13 rating in hopes to recoup the budget they had spent on the film. Throughout the course of filming, studio executives kept a close eye on Padilha, making sure he was going to deliver a PG-13 rating. At least this film comes off as more questioning the ethics of the situation. Which is either modern-day or futures

This version of ROBOCOP feels more like a comic book version that would have been understandable for popularity amongst kids in the 80’s. Whereas the original first two films from the ’80s were seen by a generation who were probably too young to see the film and despite its rating still managed to become an iconic hero mostly to kids. While being so jetted I gross violence on screen. Featuring drugs and having a more graphic satirical cynical nature.

I love the original I was one of those who saw the film way too young and loved it. Though didn’t understand it 100%, not the ramifications of what I was exactly seeing. Nick Schenk and James Vanderbilt are among the few uncredited writers who have entirely rewritten Joshua Zetumer’s screenplay.

The satire tries for reaching reactions but brings up a subject we already know to showcase. Though his is all comparative and goes against the film leaving its own identity barren as it is always being compared to its original or a similar film. Like MEMENTO and THE SALTON SEA have similar storylines through different points, direction and showcases its own story and plot in different ways

The film feels more like a video game at times but is kept realistically vivid.

It’s nice when a film manages to surprise you and is much better in quality than it was suspected and I can admit when I was wrong on the first impression. Someone’s the same can be said about people…even me.

Like MINORITY REPORT it is part of the idea that this new technology is good for keeping statistics down a bit at what cost.

Watching ROBOCOP remade and marketed as a machine feels a bit like behind the scenes of how maybe the film was made itself very meta.

I found it interesting how he is seen as a club or in the original design. Though once the new design comes into play the film moves up and a new identity takes off. That the film begins to suffer. The action scenes aren’t anything special and feel basic. Losing the part of the personality a measurement the audience came specifically to see.

I can see why the well-regarded cast chooses to be in the film. Especially Michael Keaton who makes an interesting return to form.

Jackie Earl Haley hilarious in his role wish there was more of him in the film. Other than a small role and a return towards the end.

Gary Oldman has his own Doctor Frankenstein type role starts off the film innocent, but finds himself falling in line with his employers as they give him more than he can ever want and interested to see how his invention plays out and reacts. Which also informs the audience. Though it is nice to see the original film batman in scenes with the reboots Commissioner Jim Gordon

Samuel l. Jackson’s role in this film feels like a more well spoken. J. Jonah Jameson from SPIDER-MAN for this franchise.

Interesting angle as we watch Alex Murphy not only deal with his new life change but also as he pieces together his own murder. Doesn’t seem to be as grand a plan as more random.

There is also a revenge plot that is dropped then brought up and then passes to the side as simple. For bigger machinations. Though leaves no closure as to the details.

Then there is a character change that you kind of know is coming. Though still feels strange once it happens, Once the villain is revealed. A villain more of morals I guess more than actual acts, but supervised to a degree and gave the go-ahead. It gets a little false and generalized not the individual but more what he represents and his ideas.

It tries to impart thy everyone has a price, only those who are truly brave and honest don’t

While they were successful in the making of the film and can understand why the project was greenlit. It would have been great if the film just wasn’t ROBOCOP. And was just an action film under a new name and characters. Redesigning the suit to be more updated and flexible doesn’t help. Though that point is handled well in the film as both an homage and representation. After having his time goes back to the original model. The same we in the audience have known.

I can admit I wondered I they made a sequel where would it head.

GRADE: C+

DEN OF THIEVES (2018)

Written & Directed By: Christian Gudegast 
Story By: Christian Gudegast & Paul Scheuring 
Cinematography By: Terry Stacey 
Editor: Nathan Godley, Joel Cox & David Cox 

Cast: Gerard Butler, O’Shea Jackson Jr., Pablo Schrieber, Curtis “50 Cent” Jackson, Meadow Williams, Brian Van Holt, Jordan Bridges, Dawn Olivieri, Maurice Compte, Evan Jones, Mo McRae 

A gritty L. A crime saga that follows the intersecting and often personally connected lives of an elite unit of the LA County Sheriff’s Dept. and the state’s most successful bank robbery crew as the outlaws plan a seemingly impossible heist on the Federal Reserve Bank of downtown Los Angeles.


I will be the first to admit this film is better than you might think it will be.

While you watch it. It seems to be a film that is inspired by HEAT and wants the audience to see both sides of the fence when it comes to the criminals and the cops chasing them. Though when it comes to the cops we only really see Gerard Butler’s home life and problems. When it comes to the criminals we see glimpses but mainly see 50 cent’s family and Pablo Schrieber’s planning.

At least when it comes to 50 cent’s daily the film adds some humor in the form of a warning to his daughters’ prom date. Which also helps humanize the character and the crew.

The film was in development for roughly fourteen years, where director Christian Gudegast and a writing partner had a blind deal with New Line Cinema in 2003. The project was also later supposed to be distributed by the now-defunct Relativity Media at one point as well. His original cut was 160 minutes long and had a different ending. Which would have added even more brooding to the film I am guessing.

The film is filled with testosterone galore with plenty of muscles up men with tank tops of their shirts off and sweaty. Using the guide or reasoning of working out of a home gym where they plan their caper.

It also seems to want to keep a kind of aggressive Mano e Mano tone. Where all the characters tend to be over the top tough and dangerous and females stay mostly in the background.

Though one is used as a kind of power play against one another. This only adds to the leaders of each side mutual respect but also a kind of sabotage they try against one another. As they know a showdown between them is coming and literally are sizing each other up.

Prior to filming, two separate boot camps were run in order to get the cops and the robbers in shape for their respective roles with both groups training separately to enforce a rival atmosphere. Interestingly, each group was trained differently by military consultant Paul Maurice.

O’Shea Jackson Jr.’s character is our introduction to this film and world as he is trying to be part of this crew as a getaway driver. He is the only new guy on the crew and goes through the ropes of intimidation. While also being forced by the cops to be an informant. He also seems to be our protagonist, but soon he and his storyline seem lost in the shuffle as the film begins to become a passing contest of one-up-manship between Pablo and Gerard.

While we wait for the heist that is promised to ensue. Most of the film is about the build-up of the different diversions and challenges thrown in front of each other and having to defeat or subvert in able to move forward and just as aggressive as the heist is these moves they make before are just as strong and motivated.

The film does offer beautiful visuals and quite stirring action sequences. As the heist fits all the required tension you want and expect. So that by the end it feels like a good modern-day heist caper film. Where we only learn of the logistics of the plan when it happens.

The film is building as it goes while we wait for the eventual showdown and release.

The film leaves you to wonder if the character of Gerard Butler was driven due to his failing marriage. So he seems more amped up and ready to go over the line. As it seems to be what he is good at and more capable of controlling even though supposedly more dangerous and unpredictable than a relationship. As at first he and his crew seem either dirty or more adept at bending the rules then they actually are eventually seen as pretty by the book.

By the end of the film, you have sympathy for the robbers as we meet their families and situations. Only to find out both sides were played against the other. By the end, it seems to try too hard to set itself apart by all of a sudden Introducing a twist. That while it works wasn’t really necessary.

It achieves what it set’s out to prove. It also doesn’t overthink itself or tries to show off for the audience more than what it has. Nor does it gloat or focus on any twists it offers up.

Grade: B

THE BAYTOWN OUTLAWS (2012)

Directed By: Barry Battles
Written By: Barry Battles & Griffin Hood
Cinematography By: David MacFarland
Editor: Sean Valla

Cast: Clayne Crawford, Travis Fimmel, Daniel Cudmore, Eva Longoria, Billy Bob Thornton, Andre Braugher, Michael Rapaport, Zoe Bell, Agnes Bruckner, Natalie Martinez, Brea Grant, Paul Wesley, Julio Oscar Mechoso

After her ex-husband Carlos shoots Celeste three times in the gut, it’s time to play dirty. In the fight for her godson, Rob, she hires three outlawed and redneck brothers to bring him back to her. But nothing can be that simple in the South. What begins as a small rescue mission rises to a southern battle royale. This odd team must shoot their way through gorgeous female assassins, Native American hunters, Federal agents, and a whole lot of metal coming after them, while protecting Celeste’s innocent child.


The screenplay for this film was featured in the 2009 Blacklist; a list of the “most liked” unmade scripts of the year.

From the start of the film. The film tried to hear to a degree that boils over to a degree, where it tries to take the audience constantly by surprise. Even though we all know what kind of film this is.

The film works as some kind of exploitive straight to DVD action comedy that seems to aspire for it’s own franchise. That I wouldn’t have a problem with. The film seems to be more mainstream exploitive that plays with the genre and ideas of southern justice. As it feels like a natural film that would have appeared on HBO Friday night original films that were usually action films or thrillers, with big name C-list casts.

The film seems to go out of it’s way to portray the character as white trash, southern rednecks who are surprisingly not racist.

The film harkens back to the take no prisoners action extravaganzas of the 80’s and 90’s. Yet using characters usually portrayed as villains. Redneck hillbillies as the anti-heroes. Who work as mercenaries. Here seeming to have some naive fatalism, but somewhat the most decent characters compared to most of the others in this film.

Billy Bob Thornton as the villain is fun especially with his wardrobe and hairdo as well as facial hair helping make the role more fitting. Even if he plays the role as it is more of a favor to someone.

The biggest name other then Billy Bob Thornton in this film is Eva Longoria in a sexy yet tough role.

The film is full of cliches like in all southern films that seem to have characters ridiculously sweaty for no reason. That is part of the charm.

Though the film seems partly inspired by THE BOONDOCK SANINTS films and the Tremor brothers of the film SMOKIN’ ACES. Who we saw glimpses of in both SMOKIN’ ACES films but never reached their full potential as characters or in action scenes. As we see them mostly in hints and glimpses of what they could do in those films. Kind of like when athletes are spokespeople for products going into the Olympics talking about their particular skill then flunk out at the tryouts for the Olympics all that promise and no follow through.

Here though it isn’t the same or related really. As this is a chance to see what it might have been like if they had gotten their own film. Action first, think second, plan last seems to be their motto. Just destroying and taking whatever stands in their way or really is in front of them.

Though violent social misfits. They are made likeable to a degree. Due to funny camaraderie and the amount of time we spend with them. As well as not appearing as racists. As you would expect.

It’s also fun that a different assassination group or gang. That have a certain similar creed only they are an all female biker gang of assassins and doing double duty of appearing as escorts. Or the gang of African-American road warriors in armored trucks they encounter. Using the south as a backdrop of tradition and unpredictable lawlessness. The film manages to create it’s own world and logic. That leaves the film strangely beautiful

The film plays like a mild western or a modern southern. In this case being that it takes place in the south. Though a western at heart and I story as well as character types. Though not too many strong silent types.

The film has the kind of spirit that and energy that reminds one of the films of Robert Rodriguez. Only not as over the top or campy and more within the realm of reality.

Though the film might be short on grand action sequences. This films spark of originality and fun is what seems to be missing from modern action films, that can get too bogged down in intellectualism or visuals. Instead if actually being entertaining and entertaining the audience. Action films don’t always need to give the audience something they have never never seen before. 

The film is unapologetic in it’s violence and brutality. It is also just generally funny in a dark way, but at least not disturbingly or downtrodden. Part of the humor comes from the cast especially Michael Rapaport In his solo scenes.

In the end the film is just a rollicking unapologetic hell of a good time. With little to no pretentiousness, That is a story of outsiders.

Grade: B

BABY DRIVER (2017)

Written & Directed By: Edgar Wright 
Cinematography By: Bill Pope 
Editor: Jonathan Amos & Paul Machliss 

Cast: Ansel Egort, Lilly James, Jamie Foxx, Kevin Spacey, Jon Hamm, Eiza Gonzalez, Jon Bernthal, Sky Ferreira, Paul Williams, Flea, CJ Jones


After being coerced into working for a crime boss, a young getaway driver finds himself taking part in a heist doomed to fail.


I Can’t say enough good things about this movie. Apparently, I drank it’s kool-aid and found it quite refreshing.

The film surprises, Every time Edgar Wright makes a movie it feels like a gift. Usually, it seems as it takes too long to get to us. Though it is always worth it. It gives us a glimpse of his creative imagination and skill. Even with high hopes always seem to underestimate him. The movie is quite a ride. Like a roller coaster that you never want to leave. Perfect for the summer or anytime. The movie has style for days and most of all just plain fun and never in a stupid way.

The film keeps up energy that is Infectious for the audiences. It’s a film that has a fun personality and doesn’t have to do too much to charm.

The film maintains an excitement throughout which the audience feeds off of and feels a similar excitement throughout. Which are a difficult thing to do these days as in blockbusters and films things seem so routine and planned out. That the filmmakers seem to be all over the place. Here it feels like the filmmakers and cast are constantly energized by one another and even if not necessarily personal the film feels like there was a lot of passion going into it.  

It also is nice to see the film allows for homages and references to other films and pop culture. That won’t date the film necessarily but gives it more of a modern in the moment flavor.

Like how he obscures the violence while you feel the impact. Through clever framing and blocking. There are three-way chase sequences. Where the criminals are running from the cops then not trusting one another start running away from one another and trying to catch each other realizing the other has what they need

The film includes bad guys choosing to be humane, Good guys choosing to be bad. Action sequences that don’t rely so much on fighting hand to hand combat or toughness but agility and having peace of mind to figure your way out.

The film includes a love story that keeps it’s purity because the romance is never really consummated. So that it keeps an innocence but feels kind of melodramatic like a teen film from the 1950s with dreams of hitting the open road together. Maybe as the romance is so simple, sweet, and easy. Really built off of. Itching but attraction and politeness. That it feels like first love and making a connection. Something that at first is never complicated or at least it doesn’t seem that way. Though through the actions of the films proves that each of them truly rides or die for one another.

Like a comic book come to life. It knows what type of film it is and as long as you keep that in mind you should enjoy it. As it incorporates many little left turns of genre specifics into it’s crime and love story. It feels like a candy-sweet and filled with sugar that energizes you. As well as being that colorful. It Manages to keep an innocence and wonder, That keeps you caring.

The film manages to be thrilling and menacing in the right moments. So that you are on the edge of your seat wondering what will happen. So much effortless style that you can feel it but don’t realize how remarkable it is until later on thinking back about it and, you will trust me.

The movie lacks a certain depth and sustenance, but that is truly one of it’s few weaknesses overall. Which aren’t necessarily needed in this equation.

The lead played by Ansel Egort is kind of bland, but he needs to be as usually the main characters in these types of films are the strong silent type where you can easily read whatever you want into them. Here we are given more of his backstory, but the role seems to more take advantage of Ansel Egort physically as he is skinny and limber with a bay face. That is easy to mold him into whatever you need out of a leading man.

One of the reasons for the enjoyment of the film is the supporting characters who liven up the film and add flavor where the lead does not and really can’t as his character is pretty plain and simple. He is mostly driven towards newfound goals. Though there is a reason why Jon Hamm, Kevin Spacey, and Jamie Foxx are in the movie. Whereas at first they just seem to be there to be named on the posters and big names who do nothing, but as the film goes along we see why they are in the film and are more than the unassuming roles we bought at first. They each get to reveal more about them than we originally thought. Not necessarily surprises but they liven up the film. To be more than just cops and robbers.

The big-name supporting stars are a revelation as at first they seem just there to be part of the background then they come out and show what they are truly all about. I mean this is a film where you have two Best Actor Oscar winners playing supporting roles. So there must be something about the script and film that got them to sign on in a diminished capacity (Yes I know they both were in the disappointing HORRIBLE BOSSES too. though I will think of that as more paycheck roles. Not so much here)

Jamie Foxx is memorable as an over the edge criminal who is antagonistic as he trusts no one. It seems with each crew baby works with there is one. Who more or less helps with the exposition.

Jon Hamm, seems a simple happy go, lucky thug, who comes out late in the film letting his inner psychopath out in search of revenge and retribution. He also has a certain bad boy handsome here. That makes him more a dangerous lady killer than just the usual leading man

Eiza Gonzalez is more the sexy wildfire who is both sexy and deadly but carries a kind of a mystery to her and proves to be more than what she looks like or what you would expect. though not featured too much she is a. Ice price of eye candy to go with the visuals.

Even Kevin Spacey is off the charts as the mastermind. Here he is more. Noteworthy for his middle-class menace where he can compliment and threaten in one sentence but you know he is never lying. We are used to him being the smartest person in the room and acting like he is above everyone else, but the last act moment truly shines his character in a different light. His upper-crust was doesn’t seem out of place. Nor does it distract or obstruct the flow of his character or the movie. If anything it helps feed it.

What is fun is that the villains or at least the threats to our young protagonist keep changing hands. As to who he has to be afraid of or see as a major threat and maybe overcome.

Now know this film is candy-colored and visceral with it’s excitement and shots. In the texture of course it never becomes as serious or as accomplished as films like DRIVE, THE DRIVER, and BULLIT. Though it does align itself as more of a lighter-toned chase film. It does have it’s own personality and identity. Though you would also check out those films to see where Edgar Wright might have gotten his inspiration. He even gives DRIVER director Walter Hill a cameo in the film. (Among other blink and you miss them cameos from Rappers Big Boi and Killer Mike)

Edgar Wright timed the character’s movements to the beat of the film’s songs. Even in the film’s credit sequence which is done all in one continuous tracking shot and take.

The film comes off as a nice movie that offers more of a lite touch. Though with humor and adrenaline-filled action scenes. That hardcore movie fans can enjoy for it’s more technical aspects and general audience members can enjoy as a fun action film. That is many things at once. As it pays homage to many films and genres which will seem familiar for many but new for some. One of them is a Teenage 1950’s film with diners and car racing and a love story in the middle with plans of running away together.

The soundtrack is the heartbeat for the film and the characters bot only the lead using it to fuel himself up. But also keeps the film moving. Along and on best and keeping the audience energized and going with it. Filling us with excitement and energy as well as adding some songs to our repertoire or recalling ones we think we know. As the cuts here are mostly deep ones

The film is wall to wall with music on it’s soundtrack that partially powers or motivates the protagonist due to a disability but also livens up the scenes making it feel like most of us have always wanted a soundtrack to go with our lives and actions. Sometimes with a popular song but mostly with something a little less unknown and obscure but fits the mood.

The film shows us this early in an inventive credit sequence and also in introducing us to the characters and situation in the opening scene. That allows for action but also alerts us to the character’s youth and sense of play in a tight situation. Which gives us a remembrance of the possibilities of youth? When you might never have known better about the dangers and situations you were facing. Even if you knew they were serious.

The film is lighter in touch than some more harder action movies which is part of the charm and broader appeal. 

For some they might find it too lighthearted or not enough substance and a general lack of action or even gunplay which might take them out of the film or find the film feeling like it is trying to hard to be cool. 

While it is a great film. It is also a film I can see younger people loving as it moves fast and really barely has anything offensive. Anything that does is on the edges and more due to language. So this is one of those movies I believe most ages can enjoy for the most part.

Another thing to admire about the film is that in these days of films filled with special effects for the smallest things. The director revealed that there was no CGI or green screen used to film the car chase sequences. The driving is all practically done.

It’s nice to see a film that is smaller budgeted and put out by a studio that is as exciting and fulfilling as the bigger budget blockbusters

Grade: A-

ZOMBIELAND: DOUBLE TAP (2019)

Directed By: Ruben Fleischer

Written By: Rhett Reese, Paul Wernick & Dave Callahan

Cinematography: Chung-Hoon Chung Editor: Chris Patterson & Dirk Westervelt

Cast: Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, Emma Stone, Abigail Breslin, Rosario Dawson, Luke Wilson, Thomas Middleditch, Zoey Deutch, Avan Jogia, Victoria Hall, Victor Rivera 

A decade after their first adventure, the zombie-bashing team of Columbus, Tallahassee, Wichita, and Little Rock move to the American heartland. Here, they face off against evolved zombies, fellow survivors, and the growing pains of their own makeshift family.


Just like the first film, this isn’t really a horror film more like an action-comedy that has horrific elements or a more horror background.

This sequel definitely feels less than inspired as the main cast does come back for the sequel but throughout they all look disgruntled or miserable to be here. Even though one would like to think at least they would be back to enjoy each other’s company, but it seems like everyone is more here for only here for a bigger paycheck.

The only time they seem genuinely like they like each other is in a moment towards the end when coming together in what looks like certain doom 

Though this film Came about after a failed pilot for a Zombieland television series with a different cast. Which is where Even the parody or actors Luke Wilson and Thomas Middleditch playing bizarro

Versions of Woody Harrelson and Jesse Eisenberg’s character come off as cheap weak humor. Though seem like they would be the replacements of the actors either choose not to come back or the straight to streaming sequel or if they couldn’t have gotten the actors for the first film.

Woody Harrelson seems to be the only one here who seems to give a damn or bother showing any excitement. Maybe as he finally gets a love interest and not as lovey Dovey as Jesse Eisenberg’s romance from the first film.

Even though Abigail Breslin character goes on her own throughout the film And the characters are trying to find her. The film still gives her the least amount of screen time and attention as her character just seems to be going through a teenage rebellion.

The film pretty much continues the adventures of the characters and adds very little so that it would seem more of the same. Except at least in the first film the story seemed at least creative. Here it feels like the movie and script are running on fumes.

Zoey Deutch is a newcomer to the film franchise and provides the only distraction and is the only truly funny thing about the movie. As she brightens up her scenes as a dumb blonde stereotype. As she reminds me of Valeria Andrews character in the Ashton Kutcher movie JUST MARRIED where she was one of the truly bright spots of that movie and she only really had a few scenes. 

Zoey Deutch does a lot of heavy lifting on her scenes and makes the film almost entertaining. Even though she supposed fate is telegraphed and predictable. When she is absent it Feels like they are struggling to come up with material as it goes along. Maybe an excuse to expose more of Eisenberg’s Character’s rules and theories. As well as expand them

The ending is pretty fun could have used that ingenuity earlier especially the credits sequence. 

While watching this film I kept having thoughts just as I had when watching THE WALKING DEAD.  How do they have power? Fireworks attract zombies but not lights? No defense against zombies except gates in this so-called Babylon. There is always a suspension of disbelief but one  Shouldn’t be wondering these things as you are watching it, though the film does have it’s moments. Which are mostly stylistic. This seems to be one of the only ways the director seems to want to enliven the sequel and set it apart. As with each new film he makes even outside of the franchise usually has a few visually striking scenes where you can admit you have never seen that before.

Such as the fight within the Elvis HEARTBREAK HOTEL. Which is an action sequence that manages to feel epic in such a small amount fo space that seems to depend on excellent choreography. The other sequence is the ending when forced to fight an overabundance of zombies with no guns. 

In the end, the sequel is a majorly disappointing feeling like it was made only because of demand not necessarily well thought out or organic. 

Grade: D+

THE TRANSPORTER: REFUELED (2015)


Directed By: Camille Delamarre Written By: Adam Cooper, Bill Collage, Luc Besson Based on Characters Created by Luc Besson & Robert Mark Kamen  Cinematography: Christophe Collette & Vincent Richard  Editor: Julien Rey 

Cast: Ed Skrein, Ray Stevenson, Loan Chabanol, Gabriella Wright, Tatiana Pajkovic, Noemie Lenoir 

In the south of France, former special-ops mercenary Frank Martin enters into a game of chess with a femme-fatale and her three sidekicks who are looking for revenge against a sinister Russian kingpin.


I can understand the desire to keep this franchise going, but they needed to try a bit harder to make something more Dramatic that would justify it.

As this film with a new lead playing the character might as well have been a better-funded episode of the television series based on the films. As the lead is serviceable but like the film itself is forgettable.

As the film is basically more of the same from the original films only without a recognizable charismatic leading actor.

It still has plenty of action scenes that are hand to hand and gunplay as well as plenty of high-speed chases and car stunts. So you get what you came for. As well as plenty of beautiful European women in states of undress.

Here the story revolves around the past and has more double-crosses than you can count as the transporter’s father is part of the schemes and plans this time. As the transporter seems to the only character with a code.

Watching this and the movie HITMAN is confusing as they are both similar with noticeable differences. As they both have seemingly invincible leading characters only one is actually enhanced which is why he stays invincible and faces others like himself. Here the lead character is always smarter than everyone else and extremely lucky. Not that it is ever explained fully why.

It feels like more of the same but less personal. As we have to get used to an all-new driver who lacks history or any real charisma. As to why we should care. We seem here only to watch how he completes his mission. As he comes off more as a super-spy undercover in a criminal element.

So if just looking for a quick fix of action and pretty European locations. This is a film for you. As at least I can say you will find some fun and excitement at times with this film. No matter how generic it mostly comes off as.

Grade: D

WALKING TALL (2004)

walkingtall

Directed By: Kevin Bray
Written By: David Klass, Channing Gibson, David Levien & Brian Koppelman
Based on An Earlier Screenplay By: Mort Briskin
Cinematography By: Glen MacPherson
Editor: George Bowers & Robert Ivison 


Cast: Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Johnny Knoxville, Neal McDonough, Ashley Scott, Kevin Durand, Michael Bowen, John Beasely, Kristen Wilson, Khleo Thomas, Cobie Smulders

After eight years serving the U.S. Army Special Forces, Sergeant Chris Vaughn returns to his hometown seeking for a job in the local mill. He is informed by Sheriff Stan Watkins that the mill was closed three years ago and now the Wild Cherry Casino, owned by his former high school friend Jay Hamilton, is the major source of jobs and income to the town. Chris goes home, and meets his best-friend Ray Templeton, who organized a football game with their friends. After the game, Jay invites Chris and his friends to spend the night in his casino on him, but when Chris finds that the casino crabs dealer is cheating with loaded dice, he fights against the security men and is almost killed by them. When his nephew Pete overdosed on crystal meth sold by the security men at the casino, Chris realizes that the town is dominated by the mobsters and the corrupt sheriff and with a huge piece of wood, he breaks the casino and the criminals. He is prosecuted and in the trial, he promises to the jury and to the population that if he is acquitted, he would be a candidate for sheriff and clean up the town. Later, Sheriff Chris Vaughn has to fight against the organized crime to keep his promise.

Continue reading “WALKING TALL (2004)”

PIRATES OF THE CARRIBEAN: DEAD MEN TELL NO TALES (2017)

pirates

 

Directed By: Joachim Ronning & Espen Sandberg
Written By: Jeff Nathanson
Story By: Jeff Nathanson & Terry Rossio
Based on Characters Created By: Terry Rossio, Ted Elliott, Stuart Beattie & Jay Wolpert Cinematography By: Paul Cameron
Editing By: Roger Barton & Leigh Folsom Boyd 


Cast: Johnny Depp, Geoffrey Rush, Branton Thwaites, Javier Bardem, Kaya Scodelario, Stephen Graham, Goldshifteh Farahani, Kevin McNally, David Wenham, Martin Kleeba, Angus Barnett 

Captain Jack Sparrow finds the winds of ill-fortune blowing even more strongly when deadly ghost pirates led by his old nemesis, the terrifying Captain Salazar, escape from the Devil’s Triangle, determined to kill every pirate at sea…including him. Captain Jack’s only hope of survival lies in seeking out the legendary Trident of Poseidon, a powerful artifact that bestows upon its possessor total control over the seas.

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ESCAPE PLAN (2013)

ESCAPEPLAN

Directed By: Mikael Hafstrom
Written By: Miles Chapman & Arnell Jesko
Story By: Miles Chapman
Cinematography By: Brendan Galvin
Editor: Elliot Greenberg 


Cast: Sylvester Stallone, Arnold Schwartzenegger, Amy Ryan, Jim Caviezel, Curtis “50 Cent” Jackson, Vinnie Jones, Vincent D’Onofrio, Farin Tahar, Sam Neill, Graham Beckel, Matt Gerald

Ray Breslin is the world’s foremost authority on structural security. After analyzing every high security prison and learning a vast array of survival skills so he can design escape-proof prisons, his skills are put to the test. He’s framed and incarcerated in a master prison he designed himself. He needs to escape and find the person who put him behind bars.

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THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (2012)

amazingspiderman

Directed By: Marc Webb
Written By: James Vanderbilt & Alvin Sargent & Steve Kloves
Story By: James Vanderbilt
Based on Characters Created By: Stan Lee & Steve Ditko
Cinematography: John Schwartzman
Editor: Alan Edward Bell, Michael McCusker & Pietro Scalia 


Cast: Andrew Garfield, Emma Stone, Rhys Ifans, Denis Leary, Martin Sheen, Sally Field, Irrfan Khan, C. Thomas Howell, Campbell Scott, Embeth Daviditz, Chris Zylka, Amber Stevens, Tia Texada, Hannah Marks, Vincent Laresca 


After Peter Parker is bitten by a genetically altered spider, he gains newfound, spider-like powers and ventures out to save the city from the machinations of a mysterious reptilian foe.

Continue reading “THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (2012)”